11.D.   10/5 Player Rule

	
		1.  The 10 and 5 Rule: Any player who has played in SPB for 10 or more seasons, including the last 5 consecutive 
		with his current team, may be granted a roster exemption, provided that player meets one of the following criteria:
		
  			a.    A "Bonus" Player with 400 or less real life plate appearances, 20 or less starts or 35 or less total 
  			appearances.
  			
  			b.    A player that is a Non-Bonus Player with 200 or less plate appearances, 10 or less starts or 25 or 
  			less total appearances.
  			
  			c.    If a player is in his final season in SPB, and meets the 10/5 criteria, a roster exemption will be 
  			granted to a "bonus" player regardless of the number of plate appearances or pitching appearances he has.
  			
		2. Team manager shall notify league officials of the exempted player. If approved, this player would occupy a space 
		on that teams Phase II selections for that season (in other words, you lose a Phase II selection in that year). No 
		more than 2 players may be granted such an exemption in any given season (As that would completely fill a teams 
		Phase II picks).
 
Below are some examples of how the 10/5 rule may be applied.

Example 1  1967 Elston Howard batted .178 in 345 PAs, making him a bonus player.  Elston has been in the league since 
1955 (13 seasons, and played for the same team for the past 5).  He would be granted an exception based on this rule.  
He would not be eligible for the exemption in 1968, as he exceed 200 PA and he is not a bonus player.

Example 2  1968 Harmon Killebrew batted .210 in 371 PAs, making him a bonus player.  Harmon has been in the league since 
1955 (15 seasons), and all with the same team.  He would be eligible for a roster exemption in 1968.  Based on this rule, 
he would also be eligible for a roster exemption in 1974 and 1975

Example 3- 1972 Orlando Cepeda is not a bonus player (.287 avg), but, is limited to 94 PAs.  He has played in SPB since 
1958 (15 seasons, and for the same team since 1965 (8 seasons). He would be eligible for a roster exemption.

Example 4- 1986 Dave Kingman batted .210 in 604 PA's, making him a bonus player.  In normal cases, Kingman would not be 
eligible for a roster exemption because he exceeds the 500 PA limit, but because he is in his final SPB season in 1986, 
a roster exception would be granted.